Regency Advertisements: John Ingram’s Furniture Warehouse

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Appearing in La Belle Assemblee in 1807, this ad for John Ingram’s furniture warehouse appeals to the upper orders. I found a later ad in 1832’s Cobbett’s Weekly Register advertising for the same warehouse, aimed at budget conscious shoppers:

Candice Hern: The Best Intentions

Miles, the Earl of Strickland is a handsome widower in search of a new wife to be mother to his two children. Having loved once, he seeks only a convenient arrangement with a mature woman. When two sisters come to visit his estate, the elder sister, a beautiful young widow, seems the perfect match. But Hannah, the artless younger sister, causes all his best intentions … Expand

Regency Women of Character: Diana Sperling

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  Diana Sperling (Di to family) was born in 1791 and lived, until her marriage in 1834, with her parents and siblings at Dynes Hall near Halstead (Essex).  Her whimsical, often comical, watercolors depict the lighter side of Regency life and show her obvious affection and humor for her subjects, many of whom were her siblings and friends.               … Expand

Regency Reader Questions: Glove Etiquette Part Three

“…If for some reason a woman was ungloved, proper etiquette called for the gentleman to remove his gloves before taking her hand, as it was discourtesy to behave otherwise.”When would a lady be ungloved? Even receiving, wouldn’t she be wearing gloves indoors? On the other hand, according to some articles on flirting I’ve read, ladies apparently took off their gloves at all times in order … Expand

Regency Household: A Hunting Lodge

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This beautiful hunting lodge plate and description appeared in the May 1816 edition of Ackermann’s Repository.  The large windows are meant to pull nature into the manly domain, reminding me very much of the hunting box being designed by the hero in Laura Matthews’ A Curious Courting.

Caroline Ashton: Araminta

Araminta Neave has neither aristocratic birth nor breeding. She does, however, have a father who is indecently rich from his trade with the East. That, combined with fiery curls and a temperament to match, makes her someone to reckon with. Her father wants the very best for his girl. That, he thinks, would be marriage to a Lord. But their brief visit to the autocratic … Expand

Regency Health and Medicine: Worm Lozenges

La Belle Assemblee, December 1817 John Ching patented a medicine for “destroying worms” on July 11, 1796.  The two types of lozenges, brown and yellow, were for morning and night respectively (Operative Chymist, 1997). Sold until the 1860s, both contained mercury. Here is a recipe (The Family Oracle of Health: Economy, Medicine, and Good Living, 1824)  To read about a child’s death from and the father’s campaign against these lozenges: … Expand

Guest Post: A Guy’s Guide to the Regency

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              A Guy’s Guide to Regency Romance by David Nix Just as grunting, inappropriate scratching, and endless sports trivia long have been the domain of the male of the species, so historical romance novels have belonged solidly to the realm of women. Female authors (mostly), female readers (mostly), and female bloggers (mostly). It is the “mostly” that brought me … Expand