Jessie Clever: Son of a Duke

Society’s most capable housekeeper, Eleanora Quinton, has a problem. Not only does a dead body fall right into the middle of her mistress’s ball and her son get kidnapped by nefarious spies for Napoleon, but the only person who can help her also forces her to face her most secret fears. A spy himself, Nathan Black pulls the infallible housekeeper into a cyclone of espionage, … Expand

Regency Pastimes: Pictorial Cards

Appearing in the March 1818 issue of Ackermann’s Repository, this plate of pictorial cards shows the thoughtful symbolism that could be employed in a deck of cards to titillate and stimulate conversation. That these are categorized by the magazine as “Fine Arts” also indicates their importance in cultural play.

Regency Fashion: Carriage and Evening Dresses

A bit later than typical fashion features, I found this lovely plate from March 1828’s Ladys’ Monthly Museum that I couldn’t resist sharing. I adore the added hat details and precious sprigs of flowers that nearly jump off the page with life.

Regency Travel: Wherries on the Thames

In 1796 there were over 12,000 watermen in England.  By 1828 there were more than 3,000 wherries (or rowboats) on the Thames in and around London. (Old and new London: a narrative of its history, 1881).  The wherries were small crafts meant to haul people and small items across the river, and were available in many of the major cities in the UK. At any … Expand

Joan Smith: Bath Scandal

Beatrice Searle, a beautiful and charming widow, agreed to smarten up tomboy Gillie Southam, because she believed Gillie’s half-brother, Lord Southam, would accompany her to Bath. But it was Southam’s straight-laced fiancée who actually inspired the move, and Lord Southam only came when rumors had Gillie involved with a disreputable fellow. Unfortunately, his lordship mistook Bea for a merry widow… This is a variation of … Expand

Regency Reader Questions: Yellow Bounders and the Four Horse Club

Some articles and blogs claim that all chaises and post chaises must be yellow. However, the only requirement I’ve found or a particular color of any carriage is one from the Four Horse Club, that a member’s barouche must be yellow. So… Why always yellow for the chaise? The cracking of the whips, the thundering of hooves…the dashing yellow bounder rattling along the roads must’ve … Expand