Regency Literature: A Regency Joke?

Published in the August 1806 edition of The Lady’s Monthly Museum, I found this little tidbit which appears to be a joke: Below that one was this amusing anecdote: Hopefully that made you smile (or laugh), too!

Regency Advertisements: Fashionable Silks

Appearing in the July 1817 Ackermann’s Repository, this ad for low priced silks on Hanway street from the latest French patterns. Hanway Street, near Tottenham Court Road, was originally formed in the early 18th century and was largely occupied by shopkeepers and tradesmen.  Today, it features many “offbeat” coffee bars, clubs and restaurants (https://blogs.ucl.ac.uk/survey-of-london/tag/hanway-street/). According to Johnstone’s London Commercial Guide and Street Directory (1817), Samiel … Expand

Regency Hot Spots: Soho Square Bazaar

              As late as 1839, Soho Square was described in History of London as presenting “a very pleasing and somewhat rural appearance”.  Dating back to the 1680s, it has a park and garden area in the center complete with a statue of Charles II. (here is a link to another post on the statue in the square: http://www.regrom.com/2016/11/18/regency-hot-spots-soho-square) From … Expand

Regency Science and Invention: Paris and the Modern Rollercoaster

Although a wheeled roller coaster called the Switchback is said to exist as early as the 1600s in Russia, Paris is often said to be the birthplace of the modern roller coaster for its two attempts, Les Montagnes Russes a Belleville and Promenades Aeriennes (The Incredible Scream Machine: A History of the Roller Coaster, 1987, p 20). The Russian Mountains (Les Montagnes Russes) in 1804 was “apparently…both … Expand

Top Ten: Marriage of Convenience Regency Romances

One of my favorite romance tropes (especially if comedy) is the marriage/engagement of convenience.  I haven’t analyzed why I love it very deeply, but my instinct tells me its a delight in the absurd about two people forced together who end up falling in love (because, of course, its romance and there has to be a HEA). This plot is perhaps most believable in the … Expand

Regency Words: Quiz

Cruikshank's Dandies

  Grose’s Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue, 1823 The term quiz didn’t start appearing in cant dictionaries until the 19th century. I found the usage of quiz to mean an odd fellow in a Maria Edgeworth book from 1806 (Moral tales for Young People). Chambers’s Etymological Dictionary of the English Language, 1904 Most etymological references cite this incident in Dublin as the origin: “According to B.H.Smart, … Expand