Regency Reader Questions: Glove Etiquette Part Two

This is part two on my series to answer a lot of amazing questions from a reader about gloves and glove etiquette.  Here is a link to part one. She has quoted some sources, which I have bolded and italicized.  Her comments/questions are italicized. “…A gentleman also needed to think about what to do if he was wearing dark gloves and the woman was wearing light … Expand

Guest Post: A Guy’s Guide to the Regency

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              A Guy’s Guide to Regency Romance by David Nix Just as grunting, inappropriate scratching, and endless sports trivia long have been the domain of the male of the species, so historical romance novels have belonged solidly to the realm of women. Female authors (mostly), female readers (mostly), and female bloggers (mostly). It is the “mostly” that brought me … Expand

Regency Reader Questions: Mourning Clothes and the Fiance

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Moniker/Name: Vicky Source of Question: Research Your Question: I’m currently writing a story set approximately 1803 – one of the characters is a young woman of decently good social standing, whose fiance died shortly prior to their anticipated marriage. Would she be required/expected to wear mourning clothes and abstain from entertainment for a certain time, as in the case of a spouse’s death? According to … Expand

Regency Words: That’s the Ticket!

The Scottish Guardian. January to June 1872. Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, 1895 Words, facts, and phrases; a dictionary of curious, quaint, and … 1882 Apparently, there is rampant debate as early as the 1880s about the origin of the expression “That’s the ticket.”  In use, according to research, since at least the 1820s, it is meant to describe “the very thing” or “the right … Expand

Regency Reader Questions: A Cheesy Question

  A Cheesy QuestionIn the c. 1832 publication, “Whom to Marry and How to Get Married…,” there is a description on pg 24 that implies that it is horrifyingly uncouth for a young lady to actually say “cheese.” (It’s also apparently uncouth to say “cabbage,” which should be referred to only as “greens.”) However, I have not found a single reference that says why it … Expand

Regency Fashions: Walking Dress and Morning Dress

From the April 1818 La Belle Assemblee, these gowns are perfect for the “motley display of winter, spring and almost summer” of April in Town. I have included the excerpts on General Fashion Observations and a list of gowns made for Princess Elizabeth:

Top Ten: Best Regency Romances for Teens

In no particular order, here is my top ten of Reg Roms for teens. Click on the cover to be whisked away for purchase, or hit the link on title/author to read my review. Meg Cabot: Victoria and the Rogue Short, sweet and often funny, this is a great YA read for those interested in historical romance. Anya Wylde: Dorothy Recommended for older teens, this … Expand