Regency Advertisements: Corsets for the Country

Appearing in the 1817 Ackermann’s Repository, this ad for corsets promises even those languishing provincially may have a London corset fitted to form: The image is from this site that makes reproductions and gives some more history on the Regency corset: https://www.mantua-maker.com/1810-3-corset.html

Regency Fashion: Morning and Evening Dress

These morning and evening dress plates appeared in the July 1803 edition of The Lady’s Monthly Museum.

Regency Men: The Eccentric Mad Jack

Yep, that’s a dude riding a bear.  Yep, it really happened.  And no, its probably not the craziest thing John “Mad Jack” Mytton did. Born in 1796, John Mytton was a rake of the Regency, a noted eccentric, and part of a long line of Shropshire squires. Expelled from Westminster School for fighting, followed by expulsion from Harrow demonstrated Mytton’s commitment to education was less … Expand

Regency Literature: A Regency Joke?

Published in the August 1806 edition of The Lady’s Monthly Museum, I found this little tidbit which appears to be a joke: Below that one was this amusing anecdote: Hopefully that made you smile (or laugh), too!

Regency Hot Spots: Soho Square Bazaar

              As late as 1839, Soho Square was described in History of London as presenting “a very pleasing and somewhat rural appearance”.  Dating back to the 1680s, it has a park and garden area in the center complete with a statue of Charles II. (here is a link to another post on the statue in the square: http://www.regrom.com/2016/11/18/regency-hot-spots-soho-square) From … Expand

Regency Science and Invention: Paris and the Modern Rollercoaster

Although a wheeled roller coaster called the Switchback is said to exist as early as the 1600s in Russia, Paris is often said to be the birthplace of the modern roller coaster for its two attempts, Les Montagnes Russes a Belleville and Promenades Aeriennes (The Incredible Scream Machine: A History of the Roller Coaster, 1987, p 20). The Russian Mountains (Les Montagnes Russes) in 1804 was “apparently…both … Expand

Top Ten: Marriage of Convenience Regency Romances

One of my favorite romance tropes (especially if comedy) is the marriage/engagement of convenience.  I haven’t analyzed why I love it very deeply, but my instinct tells me its a delight in the absurd about two people forced together who end up falling in love (because, of course, its romance and there has to be a HEA). This plot is perhaps most believable in the … Expand