Regency Hot Spots: Private Art Collections

The private art collection is a distinguishing feature of the wealthy (for a modern update to some of the Duke of Bridgewater’s collection, see this fascinating article from 2008: http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/art/news/sometimes-one-can-have-just-too-many-titians-913933.html) At the beginning of the 19th century, the practice of opening collections to public inspection was becoming increasingly common (http://www.tate.org.uk/research/publications/tate-papers/24/william-hazlitts-account-of-mr-angersteins-collection-of-pictures).  These collections and viewings would, literally, become the foundation of places like the British National … Expand

Regency Men: Anthony le Texier

Anthony A. Le Texier (1731-1814) was a French actor and director “renowned for being able to put on a play by acting all the different parts himself” (The Additional Journals and Letters of Frances Burney, 2015, p.13)  He was also known, in London, as a “sort of theatrical fixer” including translating and selecting French language pieces for the London stage (Shakespeare and Amateur Performance: A … Expand

Megan Mulry: Bound to Be a Groom

Sometimes our wildest dreams come true. In the tumultuous summer of 1808, Spain and England are close to war and four young lovers are close to ecstasy. To carve out an independent life with the woman she loves, Anna knows she must leave her quiet Spanish convent to become a courtesan. To gain experience, she sets her sights on . . Sebastian, whose powerful, aristocratic … Expand

Regency Reader Questions: Seasons and Wards

Regency Reader Question My question is rather specific, so please forgive that, but I have not any luck in finding any information for this problem. In my book, the girl is left an orphan, and she is then sent to live with a friend of the father (since he chooses who will be the next guardian), who is of higher rank. This is after she … Expand