Regency Culture and Society: Disappointed Hopes

This article appeared in the August 1803 issue of The Lady’s Monthly Museum, and describes a scene familiar from literature and Regency romances about disappointed hopes and a practiced rakehells dalliance.  It provides authors and readers alike with a real life (presumably) example of a man toying with a young lady’s affection:

Regency Reader Questions: Mourning Clothes and the Fiance

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Moniker/Name: Vicky Source of Question: Research Your Question: I’m currently writing a story set approximately 1803 – one of the characters is a young woman of decently good social standing, whose fiance died shortly prior to their anticipated marriage. Would she be required/expected to wear mourning clothes and abstain from entertainment for a certain time, as in the case of a spouse’s death? According to … Expand

Regency Reader Questions: A Cheesy Question

  A Cheesy QuestionIn the c. 1832 publication, “Whom to Marry and How to Get Married…,” there is a description on pg 24 that implies that it is horrifyingly uncouth for a young lady to actually say “cheese.” (It’s also apparently uncouth to say “cabbage,” which should be referred to only as “greens.”) However, I have not found a single reference that says why it … Expand