Regency Reader Questions: Mourning Clothes and the Fiance

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Moniker/Name: Vicky Source of Question: Research Your Question: I’m currently writing a story set approximately 1803 – one of the characters is a young woman of decently good social standing, whose fiance died shortly prior to their anticipated marriage. Would she be required/expected to wear mourning clothes and abstain from entertainment for a certain time, as in the case of a spouse’s death? According to … Expand

Regency Reader Questions: A Cheesy Question

  A Cheesy QuestionIn the c. 1832 publication, “Whom to Marry and How to Get Married…,” there is a description on pg 24 that implies that it is horrifyingly uncouth for a young lady to actually say “cheese.” (It’s also apparently uncouth to say “cabbage,” which should be referred to only as “greens.”) However, I have not found a single reference that says why it … Expand

Regency Culture and Society: Botanical Emblems

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Appearing in the January 1820 La Belle Assemblee, this collection of Botanical Emblems features symbols for truth, joy, and superstition.  A young lady may use this information to inform paintings, embroidery or poetry, invoking all the symbolic history of flora and fauna.  Other examples from La Belle Assemblee demonstrate that while the language of flowers wouldn’t be widespread until the Victorian era, it was nonetheless … Expand