Regency Literature: A Regency Joke?

Published in the August 1806 edition of The Lady’s Monthly Museum, I found this little tidbit which appears to be a joke: Below that one was this amusing anecdote: Hopefully that made you smile (or laugh), too!

Regency Culture and Society: Hints for Young Married Women

A lot of the Regency Reader Questions I receive are related to etiquette and how ought a young lady to behave in a variety of circumstances.  I found this article in the July 1803 Lady’s Monthly Museum and thought it might be of interest for those readers and writers hoping to understand the expectations Regency society had for young women recently wed. There are even … Expand

Regency Literature: The Literary Spy of 1808

Emma_Corbett

Published in the June 1808 edition of the Lady’s Monthly Museum, this short column gives us an overview of various era authors and what some general sentiments of them were. Samuel Jackson Pratt (penname Courtney Melmoth) was a poet, dramatist and novelist born in 1749. Recognized as an early advocate for animal welfare, his most famous book was Emma Corbett: Or, The miseries of civil war … Expand

Regency Culture and Society: The Persian Student in London

I heard of a fascinating new book on NPR the other day, the recounting of a diary of Persian student who travelled, with five other students, to study in London in 1815.  The new release The Love of Strangers: What Six Muslim Students Learned in Jane Austen’s London by Nile Green relates the adventures of the Muslim young men as they immerse themselves in British Regency … Expand