Regency Men: The Eccentric Mad Jack

Yep, that’s a dude riding a bear.  Yep, it really happened.  And no, its probably not the craziest thing John “Mad Jack” Mytton did. Born in 1796, John Mytton was a rake of the Regency, a noted eccentric, and part of a long line of Shropshire squires. Expelled from Westminster School for fighting, followed by expulsion from Harrow demonstrated Mytton’s commitment to education was less … Expand

Regency Men: Anthony le Texier

Anthony A. Le Texier (1731-1814) was a French actor and director “renowned for being able to put on a play by acting all the different parts himself” (The Additional Journals and Letters of Frances Burney, 2015, p.13)  He was also known, in London, as a “sort of theatrical fixer” including translating and selecting French language pieces for the London stage (Shakespeare and Amateur Performance: A … Expand

Regency Culture and Society: John Glover’s Exhibition

Appearing in the June 1821 issue of La Belle Assemblee, this review of John Glover’s exhibition gives a flavor of his work and personality.  Glover later emigrated to Australia, and became the “father of Austrialian landscape painting”, even though he was only in Austrian from the age of 64 until his death in 1849 at 82. You can view several of his pieces here: https://www.artgallery.nsw.gov.au/collection/works/?artist_id=glover-john

Regency Literature: The Literary Spy of 1808

Emma_Corbett

Published in the June 1808 edition of the Lady’s Monthly Museum, this short column gives us an overview of various era authors and what some general sentiments of them were. Samuel Jackson Pratt (penname Courtney Melmoth) was a poet, dramatist and novelist born in 1749. Recognized as an early advocate for animal welfare, his most famous book was Emma Corbett: Or, The miseries of civil war … Expand