Regency Reader Questions: Glove Etiquette Part Two

This is part two on my series to answer a lot of amazing questions from a reader about gloves and glove etiquette.  Here is a link to part one. She has quoted some sources, which I have bolded and italicized.  Her comments/questions are italicized. “…A gentleman also needed to think about what to do if he was wearing dark gloves and the woman was wearing light … Expand

Regency Reader Questions: Glove Etiquette Part One

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Question: I am confused about glove etiquette. When did a gentleman remove his gloves? Some specific examples from the reader demonstrate what a tangled web is the etiquette of gloves.  You may remember my post a year or so ago about gentlemen’s gloves and some of the contradictory instructions about how when/where men might take off their gloves.  The most unanimous direction was that a gentleman … Expand

Regency Reader Questions: Yellow Bounders and the Four Horse Club

Some articles and blogs claim that all chaises and post chaises must be yellow. However, the only requirement I’ve found or a particular color of any carriage is one from the Four Horse Club, that a member’s barouche must be yellow. So… Why always yellow for the chaise? The cracking of the whips, the thundering of hooves…the dashing yellow bounder rattling along the roads must’ve … Expand

Regency Men: Martin Archer Shee

Born in Dublin on Dec. 20, 1769, Martin Archer Shee would eventually rise to acclaim as a portrait painter and president of the Royal Academy in 1830. The Life of Sir Martin Archer Shee: President of the Royal Academy, 1860 He became active in London by 1788, and was “second only to Lawrence as the leading society portraitist” (http://www.artuk.org/discover/artists/shee-martin-archer-1769-1850).  He was under the guidance of … Expand