Regency Culture and Society: On Female Politicians

I spied this article in the October 1800 edition of The Lady’s Monthly Museum and found it fascinating…so had to share. Although it cites a French publication (and very sexist one at that), its inclusion in the Regency rag no doubt indicates the idea of a female politician is amusing at best.

Regency Literature: The Literary Spy of 1808

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Published in the June 1808 edition of the Lady’s Monthly Museum, this short column gives us an overview of various era authors and what some general sentiments of them were. Samuel Jackson Pratt (penname Courtney Melmoth) was a poet, dramatist and novelist born in 1749. Recognized as an early advocate for animal welfare, his most famous book was Emma Corbett: Or, The miseries of civil war … Expand

Regency Women of Character: Diana Sperling

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  Diana Sperling (Di to family) was born in 1791 and lived, until her marriage in 1834, with her parents and siblings at Dynes Hall near Halstead (Essex).  Her whimsical, often comical, watercolors depict the lighter side of Regency life and show her obvious affection and humor for her subjects, many of whom were her siblings and friends.               … Expand

Regency Women of Character: “Unbecoming” Lady Drivers

I was doing some research and ran across this account of women drivers in Hyde Park from a very starched up sexist American, and thought it was too interesting not to share.  Not the misogynistic part, the bad-a lady driving part. A Journal of Travels in England, Holland and Scotland, 1820   Almost thirty years later, there seemed to be a more practical approach to ladies … Expand