Regency Travel: English Travelers Behaving Badly

Appearing in the September 1817 edition of Ackermann’s Repository, this is a first hand account of British travelers becoming persona non grata all over Europe.  I thought this was super interesting, and hope you enjoy it to.  It includes some etiquette and hints for Continental visitors.    

Regency Travel: Wherries on the Thames

In 1796 there were over 12,000 watermen in England.  By 1828 there were more than 3,000 wherries (or rowboats) on the Thames in and around London. (Old and new London: a narrative of its history, 1881).  The wherries were small crafts meant to haul people and small items across the river, and were available in many of the major cities in the UK. At any … Expand

Regency Travel: The Prevalence of Conveyances

The History of Coaches, George Athelstane Thrupp To round out a month full of tidbits about travelling around in the Regency, I snipped the info below from a book called The History of Coaches. The increase in coaches definitely indicates a rising middle class, as well as perhaps more efficiency in manufacturing coaches thus making it more affordable. Although many of these would have been … Expand

Regency Reader Questions: Yellow Bounders and the Four Horse Club

Some articles and blogs claim that all chaises and post chaises must be yellow. However, the only requirement I’ve found or a particular color of any carriage is one from the Four Horse Club, that a member’s barouche must be yellow. So… Why always yellow for the chaise? The cracking of the whips, the thundering of hooves…the dashing yellow bounder rattling along the roads must’ve … Expand