Regency Travel: Wherries on the Thames

In 1796 there were over 12,000 watermen in England.  By 1828 there were more than 3,000 wherries (or rowboats) on the Thames in and around London. (Old and new London: a narrative of its history, 1881).  The wherries were small crafts meant to haul people and small items across the river, and were available in many of the major cities in the UK. At any … Expand

Joan Smith: Bath Scandal

Beatrice Searle, a beautiful and charming widow, agreed to smarten up tomboy Gillie Southam, because she believed Gillie’s half-brother, Lord Southam, would accompany her to Bath. But it was Southam’s straight-laced fiancée who actually inspired the move, and Lord Southam only came when rumors had Gillie involved with a disreputable fellow. Unfortunately, his lordship mistook Bea for a merry widow… This is a variation of … Expand