Regency Health and Medicine: Worm Lozenges

La Belle Assemblee, December 1817 John Ching patented a medicine for “destroying worms” on July 11, 1796.  The two types of lozenges, brown and yellow, were for morning and night respectively (Operative Chymist, 1997). Sold until the 1860s, both contained mercury. Here is a recipe (The Family Oracle of Health: Economy, Medicine, and Good Living, 1824)  To read about a child’s death from and the father’s campaign against these lozenges: … Expand

Regency H(n)ot Spots: Cranbourne Alley

(The above is a millinery shop in Paris c. 1822) Cranbourn(e) Alley (or Street) was a paved pedestrian thoroughfare that led from Castle Street to the north east corner of Leicester Square. Beginning in 1678, it was long populated by milliners and other clothing items. London, Past and Present, 1891 By the Regency era, it was the premier destination for purchasing head wear, particularly for … Expand

Regency Advertisments: The Secret of Poonah

Appeared in the 1817 La Belle Assemblee.   Poonah painting was a style popular in the 19th century in which “thick opaque color is applied without background and with scarcely any shading, to thin paper, producing flowers, birds, etc in imitation of Oriental work” (Websters dictionary, 1913).   Below are some more descriptions of the style of painting.  It also can describe velvet painting. Deriving its … Expand