Regency Reader Questions: Hyde Park and Driving in the Dark

Question: All the schedules I can find indicate that one called on acquaintances at 5 pm or later.  And that the “fashionable hour” was from about 4:30 to 7:30 pm. If the Season was basically winter, that means people were shopping and promenading driving in Hyde Park in the dark. In dark and dreary weather. Yet no one says, these things happened in the dark … Expand

Regency Events: The London Beer Flood of 1814

Meux Brewery

In looking into breweries in London, I ran into the story of the Great London Beer Flood of 1814….and thought this was a great opportunity to start a new blog category: Regency Events! On October 17, 1814 in St. Giles at around 5:30 PM, a huge vat containing over 135,000 imperial gallons of beer (roughly 1.3 million pints) ruptured at the Meux and Company Brewery.  A wave … Expand

London Hot Spots: The Porter Brewery

The ambulator; or, The stranger’s companion in a tour round London (1807) Porter beer rose in popularity in the 1700s, and would begin to dwindle in popularity in the 1820s.  Much of its popularity was related to its favor with the working class of industrializing London.  According to a letter from Cesar de Saussure in 1726: “In this country nothing but beer is drunk, and … Expand

Regency H(n)ot Spots: Cranbourne Alley

(The above is a millinery shop in Paris c. 1822) Cranbourn(e) Alley (or Street) was a paved pedestrian thoroughfare that led from Castle Street to the north east corner of Leicester Square. Beginning in 1678, it was long populated by milliners and other clothing items. London, Past and Present, 1891 By the Regency era, it was the premier destination for purchasing head wear, particularly for … Expand