Regency Travel: Wherries on the Thames

In 1796 there were over 12,000 watermen in England.  By 1828 there were more than 3,000 wherries (or rowboats) on the Thames in and around London. (Old and new London: a narrative of its history, 1881).  The wherries were small crafts meant to haul people and small items across the river, and were available in many of the major cities in the UK. At any … Expand

Regency Advertisements: Studies in Landscape

January 1818 Ackermann’s Repository This is actually pretty impressive, as John Laporte (1761-1839) was a talented and known landscape painter and etcher.  From London, Laporte’s daughter and son would also become famous artists in their own right.  Below is one of Laporte’s paintings.

Regency Reader Questions: Hyde Park and Driving in the Dark

Question: All the schedules I can find indicate that one called on acquaintances at 5 pm or later.  And that the “fashionable hour” was from about 4:30 to 7:30 pm. If the Season was basically winter, that means people were shopping and promenading driving in Hyde Park in the dark. In dark and dreary weather. Yet no one says, these things happened in the dark … Expand