Regency (H)not Spots: Aldersgate Street

    Aldersgate Street, in the City of London along the ancient London Wall, was named after the northern gate of the city. From the commercial guide of 1818, its clear to see it was a busy street full of a variety of merchants. It was also the home to several coaching inns for routes to the north. By no means a fashionable street, it … Expand

Regency Advertisements: Fashionable Silks

Appearing in the July 1817 Ackermann’s Repository, this ad for low priced silks on Hanway street from the latest French patterns. Hanway Street, near Tottenham Court Road, was originally formed in the early 18th century and was largely occupied by shopkeepers and tradesmen.  Today, it features many “offbeat” coffee bars, clubs and restaurants (https://blogs.ucl.ac.uk/survey-of-london/tag/hanway-street/). According to Johnstone’s London Commercial Guide and Street Directory (1817), Samiel … Expand

Regency Hot Spots: Soho Square Bazaar

              As late as 1839, Soho Square was described in History of London as presenting “a very pleasing and somewhat rural appearance”.  Dating back to the 1680s, it has a park and garden area in the center complete with a statue of Charles II. (here is a link to another post on the statue in the square: http://www.regrom.com/2016/11/18/regency-hot-spots-soho-square) From … Expand

Regency H(n)ot Spots: Cranbourne Alley

(The above is a millinery shop in Paris c. 1822) Cranbourn(e) Alley (or Street) was a paved pedestrian thoroughfare that led from Castle Street to the north east corner of Leicester Square. Beginning in 1678, it was long populated by milliners and other clothing items. London, Past and Present, 1891 By the Regency era, it was the premier destination for purchasing head wear, particularly for … Expand