Regency Pastimes: Pictorial Cards

Appearing in the March 1818 issue of Ackermann’s Repository, this plate of pictorial cards shows the thoughtful symbolism that could be employed in a deck of cards to titillate and stimulate conversation. That these are categorized by the magazine as “Fine Arts” also indicates their importance in cultural play.

Regency Reader Questions: Shoes and Feet

Question: I’ve read that most tailors were men, that ladies got their footgear from these male tailors, and that the tailor himself tended to serve the client. So did a lady of the ton–did any lady–allow a male tailor to touch and handle her feet and ankles? Measure her, fit the slipper or boot? Did she actually show leg to a strange man? (Eg, how … Expand

Regency Women of Character: “Unbecoming” Lady Drivers

I was doing some research and ran across this account of women drivers in Hyde Park from a very starched up sexist American, and thought it was too interesting not to share.  Not the misogynistic part, the bad-a lady driving part. A Journal of Travels in England, Holland and Scotland, 1820   Almost thirty years later, there seemed to be a more practical approach to ladies … Expand

Regency Women of Character: Madame Saqui

Appearing in the January 1820 edition of La Belle Assemblee, this brief biographical sketch of tight rope walker Madame Saqui highlights her active acrobatics. Beyond being a talented performer, Madame Saqui was also a business woman, although she was best remembered as a Vauxhall performer. Eliza Cook’s Journal 1852